Lambretta

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A scooter originally manufactured by Innocenti in Milan, Italy. It was intended to be a more stylish and higher-performance scooter to the Vespa manufactured by Piaggio.

Innocenti, the company, was originally a steel tubing manufacturer owned by Ferdinando Innocenti. Due to the damage World War II inflicted upon Italy's infrastructure, Innocenti, like Piaggio, decided to shift focus to manufacturing scooters.

Production of the first Lambretta began in 1947. The first Lambretta, the Model A, was manufactured in Milan and introduced in October 1947. The next several models included the Model B, Model C/LC, Model D/LD, Model E, and Model F.

Models followed throughout the years, including the Li, TV, SX and GP (also known as a DL).

The earlier models - Li and TV (Series One and Series Two) had a more rounded and curvacious body shape.

There were monocoque framed bikes made - These were the J range - Named the J50, Starstream, and Super Starsteam.

Due to financial difficulties, Innocenti ceased production of the Lambretta in 1970, selling the original manufacturing plant to Scooters India, Limited (SIL) which was moved to India. The Serveta company of Eibar, Spain also manufactured Lambrettas with slight variations from the original Innocenti designs. Variations were also seen in South America in the 1960's and 1970's under the marque Pasco, of Brazil, and Auteco, of Columbia. SIL commenced production of the older Innocenti designs around 1979, ceasing production of SIL GP200 scooters in 1997.

In June 2004, Lambretta International and Classic Motorcycle and Sidecar Incorporated (CMSI) signed an agreement to develop a 250cc Lambretta, powered by a Piaggio engine. The prototype debuted at the 2005 Dealer Expo in Indianapolis February 19-21, 2005. The manufacturing location has yet to be announced. There has been no official launch date announced.

Also, American Scooter Center (ASC) of Austin, Texas, and other scooter concessionaires, have commenced sales of restored SIL GP200s.

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