Type Ii Accessory Navicular Treatment

From scoot.net

Jump to: navigation, search

Overview
Sometimes, feet do weird things. For instance, about 10% of the general population?s feet have decided that having an extra bone in the mix is a really great idea. This extra bone (or sometimes a bit of cartilage), is called an accessory navicular. It shows up in a tendon called the posterior tibial tendon (which is a fancy name - but just remember, it helps support the arch of the foot) on the middle of the inside of the foot, just above the arch. This extra little bone What is limb lengthening surgery? present from birth, so it?s not something that?ll suddenly grow later in life. Now, accessory navicular syndrome is when that extra bone starts causing issues with your shoe-wearing, or even the shape and function of your foot. It?s the syndrome you want to worry about, not necessarily the extra bone itself.



Causes
Like all painful conditions, ANS has a root cause. The cause could be the accessory navicular bone itself producing irritation from shoes or too much activity. Often, however, it is related to injury of one of the structures that attach to the navicular bone. Structures that attach to the navicular bone include abductor hallucis muscle, plantar calcaneonavicular ligament (spring ligament) parts of the deltoid ligament, posterior tibial tendon.

Symptoms
One obvious problem with the accessory navicular is that it may be large and stick out from the inside of the foot. This can cause it to rub against shoes and so become quite painful. The fibrous connection between the accessory navicular and the navicualar, as well, is easy to injure, also leading to pain. This is kind of like a fracture, and such injuries cause the bone to move around too easily, leading to pain with activity. When the connection between the bones is injured in this way, the two bones do not always heal properly, so pain may continue unabated.

Diagnosis
To diagnose accessory navicular syndrome, medical staff ask about the patient?s activities and symptoms. They will examine the foot for irritation or swelling. Medical staff evaluate the bone structure, muscle, joint motion, and the patient?s gait. X-rays can usually confirm the diagnosis. MRI or other imaging tests may be used to determine any irritation or damage to soft-tissue structures such as tendons or ligaments. Because navicular accessory bone irritation can lead to bunions, heel spurs and plantar fasciitis, it?s important to seek treatment.

Non Surgical Treatment
Most children?s symptoms are improved or resolved by taking a break from activities that irritate their feet. Shoe inserts that pad the accessory navicular area are also helpful. If your child?s symptoms do not improve, your physician may recommend a below-the-knee cast or walking boot. Surgery is rarely needed.



Surgical Treatment
If non-surgical treatment fails to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome, surgery may be appropriate. Surgery may involve removing the accessory bone, reshaping the area, and repairing the posterior tibial tendon to improve its function. This extra bone is not needed for normal foot function.

Th1s1sanart1cl3s1te

Personal tools